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Another Taste of Nordic Cuisine for the English Cook

Another Taste of Nordic Cuisine for the English Cook

Magnus Nilsson announces his plans to release a second cookbook in the wake of Fäviken

Swedish chef Magnus Nilsson has announced that he plans to publish a second cookbook to demystify his beloved Nordic cuisine.

Nilsson’s first cookbook, Fäviken, was met by immediate success because of its focus on using only pure, Nordic ingredients at his restaurant located in Northern Sweden. While his first cookbook had a strong focus on his restaurant, his second will be a comprehensive look at Nordic cuisine, incorporating 1,000 regional recipes and the history behind them.

Nilsson tells Phaidon, “The idea is that there has been nothing comprehensive published in English on Nordic Cooking, basically ever,” Nilsson says as he explains his motives for the second book. He plans to explain Nordic cuisine through its regional differences, and through what each country has in common and how they are vastly different. The book has not yet been given a release date but is expected to come out sometime in 2015.


The perfect slice for a wintery outdoor lunch – a slab of seeded bread decked out with chestnut-flavoured creme fraiche, sweet and sour fruity jam and strips of bacon and venison, seared, grilled and supremely savoury.

Makes 2
2 tsp juniper berries
2 tsp allspice
1 tsp pink peppercorns
½ tsp black peppercorns
1 tsp salt
400g venison loin
20g butter
A drop of rapeseed oil
4 rashers smoked streaky bacon
1 multi-seed loaf

For the lingonberry jam
250g lingonberries (or cranberries)
50g sugar

For the chestnut creme fraiche
50g chestnuts
300g creme fraiche

1 Preheat your oven to 160C/325F/gas mark 3. Blitz together the spices and salt, then rub it all over the venison loin. Heat the butter and rapeseed oil in an ovenproof pan. When the butter is bubbling, sear the meat on both sides, turning occasionally, until it is beautifully brown. Put the pan in the oven for 7 minutes, then take it out and wrap with foil for 15 minutes to rest.

2 Combine the lingonberries and sugar in another frying pan and cook them over a medium-low heat for 5‑7 minutes, then transfer them to a bowl.

3 Finally, in a separate bowl, blitz together the chestnuts and creme fraiche until they are smooth.

4 Preheat the grill to medium-high, then arrange the bacon beneath the grill. Slice the multi-seed loaf and lightly toast under the grill also. Once the bacon is crispy, take it out, then smear the chestnut creme fraiche on to one side of the toast.

5 Slice the venison thinly and place a few slices on top of the creme fraiche along with a couple of rashers of bacon, then spoon the lingonberry jam on top and enjoy.
Matthew Young, Brook Green Wild Food Market, wildfoodmarket.co.uk


The New Nordic Food Manifesto

The New Nordic Food manifesto has an innovative approach to traditional foods combined with a strong focus on health and an ethical production philosophy.

The Nordic cuisine should create and inspire the joy of food, taste and variety, nationally and internationally, according to the initial vision:

”As Nordic chefs we find that the time has now come for us to create a New Nordic Kitchen, which in virtue of its good taste and special character compares favorable with the standard of the greatest kitchens of the world”, the Manifesto states.

The aims of the New Nordic Kitchen are:

  1. To express the purity, freshness, simplicity and ethics we wish to associate to our region.
  2. To reflect the changes of the seasons in the meal we make.
  3. To base our cooking on ingredients and produce whose characteristics are particularly in our climates, lanscapes and waters.
  4. To combine the demand for good taste with modrn knowledge of health and well-being.
  5. To promote Nordic products and the variety of Nordic producers - and to spread the word about their underlying cultures.
  6. To promote animal welfare and a sound production process in our seas, on our farmland and in the wild.
  7. To develop potentially new applications of traditional Nordic food products.
  8. To combine the best in Nordic cookery and culinary traditions with impulses from abroad.
  9. To combine local self-suffiency with regional sharing of high-quality products.
  10. To join forces with consumer representatives, other cooking craftsmen, agriculture, fishing, food, retail and wholesales industries, researchers, teachers, politicians and authorities on this project for the benefit and advantage of everyone in the Nordic countries.

List of signatories:

  • Erwin Lauterbach, Denmark
  • Eyvind Hellstrøm, Norway
  • Fredrik Sigurdsson, Iceland
  • Gunndur Fossdal, Faroe Islands
  • Hákan Örvarsson, Iceland
  • Hans Välimäki, Finland
  • Leif Sørensen, Faroe Islands
  • Mathias Dahlgren, Sweden
  • Michael Björklund, Åland
  • René Redzepi, Denmark
  • Roger Malmin, Norway
  • Rune Collin, Greenland

Related articles:

Interviews with chefs who signed the Kitchen Manifesto.


Recipes from Nicaragua, Food, Cuisine

The Nicaraguan diet consists mainly of corn, beans and rice, flavored with a variety of spices and cooked in a number of interesting ways. Experience the tantalizing taste experience of Nicaraguan cuisine with these food recipes from Nicaragua. We are certain you will have a good time cooking and savoring these delicious Nicaraguan recipes.

Nacatamales

Nacatamales are corncakes, similar to Mexican tamales, stuffed with rice, vegetables and meats. The dough is then wrapped in banana leaves and steamed.

  • 2 cups Cornmeal
  • 1/4 cup Lard
  • 1 Onion, chopped
  • 2 teaspoons of Sour Orange Juice or Lime
  • 2 cups Chicken Broth (or other broth you prefer)
  • 2 Garlic Cloves, minced
  • 1 Green Pepper, chopped
  • 1 Red Pepper, chopped
  • 1 teaspoon Fresh Parsley
  • Fresh Mint to taste
  • Paprika to taste
  • 1 pound Pork, cooked and cubed
  • 2 Tomatoes, cubed
  • 2 cups Potatoes, mashed
  • 1/2 cup Rice, cooked
  • Ground pepper to taste
  • Salt to taste
  • 10 Banana Leaves

Just cover the cornmeal with water, adding the orange juice and then cooking it at a low heat so that the hulls begin to separate. Then rinse with cold water, placing it in a pot and again covering it with water. Allow it to sit for 3 days, being sure to change the water every day. Once it has stood for 3 days, drain the corn and mash it. Now add half of the lard, plus some salt. Knead the mixture whilst slowly adding the broth until the dough is soft.

In a pan, place the rest of the lard, along with the peppers, onion, garlic, tomatoes, paprika, salt, pepper, mint and parsley. Then add the pork and other ingredients.
Wash the banana leaves and cut into 16 inch squares. Place a spoonful of dough in the center of each leaf square, then top with pork mixture. Carefully wrap and tie with string. Place the nacatamales in boiling water for about 30 minutes. Enjoy!

Gallo Pinto

Gallo Pinto is Nicaragua’s most popular dish, eaten at any time of the day.

  • 2 tbsp vegetable oil
  • 2 lrg onions – thinly sliced
  • 2 cups cooked red beans
  • ¼ cup water
  • 1 cup cooked white rice

Beans: cook 1 cup of dry red beans with 6 crushed cloves of garlic and water in a pressure cooker for 15 to 20 minutes.
Sauté the onion in a pot. Add in the cooked beans and water. Cook for 5 minutes at a low heat whilst stirring. The beans must remain whole. Now add the cooked rice and simmer for a further 10 minutes, still stirring.

Maduros

  • 4 maduros (sweet bananas) peeled
  • 3 cups milk
  • 2 cinnamon sticks
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla

Place maduros and milk in a bowl and boil until tender. Add the sugar, cinnamon and vanilla, boiling for another 5 minutes. Place it in a dish and bake in the oven for 30 minutes at 350°F.

Refried Beans

A popular dish, served as part of a variety of meals.

  • Uncooked black beans
  • Garlic
  • Onion
  • Vegetable oil
  • salt
  • chopped tomato
  • lemon juice
  • seasonings

Boil washed beans in a pressure cooker until soft. Add salt, garlic and onion during the cooking process. Sauté onions in a pan. Quickly add beans and left over water. Continuously add more water as it cooks down. This will ensure that the beans get a sweeter and smooth texture. On the last round add the chopped tomato, lemon juice and seasoning. Mash it up.

Fresco De Pina y Arroz

No meal is complete without some refreshment. This chilled pineapple rice drink will definitely cool you down.

Boil pineapple rind for 10 minutes in sufficient water to cover the rinds half-way. Add the rice and boil until it splits or puffs. Allow to cool and then strain. Dilute with twice the amount of water. Add sugar as needed.


Nordic Cooking

Nordic Cooking is about preparing simple, hardy meals that are low-sodium, tasty and nourishing. None of the recipes call for even a touch of salt. These meals get their flavor from Skyrim’s bounty: vegetables, wild game, wines, and the lands wide selections of mead. No vanilla items altered.

This mod does not have any known dependencies other than the base game.

Mods requiring this file

Author's instructions

Contact me for permission before using my mod in another mod. Do not upload my mod to any other site or service.

You are allowed to make patches for my mod and publish them. Please link to the original mod on your patch page.

File credits

This author has not credited anyone else in this file

Donation Points system

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Translations available on the Nexus

Language Name
French Author: Author Angryblock Traducteur Myraziel French - Nordic Cooking

Version 1.2

  • Removed the recipe book since it is not needed and required editing a vanilla cell. The recipes are simple enough and the book adding nothing to the experience.

Version 1.1

  • Added keywords for Frostfall. Frostfall NOT required but if you have it, the soups and hot drinks will add warmth.

Nordic Cooking is about preparing simple, hardy meals that are low-sodium, tasty and nourishing. None of the recipes call for even a touch of salt. These meals get their flavor from Skyrim’s bounty: vegetables, wild game, wines, and the land's wide selections of mead. The careful combination of these local foods results in meals that will help you thrive in this beautiful but dangerous land.

Eat simply. Eat Well.

Converted for Skyrim Special Edition using the 64Bit CK.

This mod uses vanilla ingredients to create meals and drinks that give moderate but long lasting buffs to things like health, magicka, stamina regeneration as well as magical resistance, armor, night-eye, and so forth. The idea came from playing MMOs where the players have special raid food at the start of the raid giving a moderate boost to key stats and that last 30 minutes or more. I play on hard difficulty settings with lots of combat mods so a dungeon crawl is an challenge. Having a 30 minute buff to health, stamina and magicka regeneration helps a lot and makes sense in terms of immersion.

No vanilla assets were changed so the mod should be compatible with everything. Recipes never call for more than three ingredients and salt is never one of them. I don't like having the track down salt just to cook especially since it's in the alchemy category and can be scarce at times.

All food and drinks are created at any cooking station. To keep clutter to a minimum, the individual recipes only display if you have the required items in your inventory. The items are common so you should see items popping up often without having to consult the cook book to go find them.

There are many recipes but only a few meals. This means you can create a Nordic Cheese Soup with many different cheeses but all the recipes produce the same soup with the same buff. This keeps things simple and the clutter in your inventory bag down as well.

All my crafted food and drinks have the Nordic as the first word to group them together in your bag. I included some vegetarian items for those role players who don’t enjoy the blessing that is charred meat. Internally all coding objects I created are prefixed simpleMods to make them easy to find if you want to alter something for your personal taste.

Buffs
The buffs are just a few to keep it simple. They are also moderate but designed for a high-difficulty game setting. I play on expert/master with a lot of combat mods. If you play on normal the buffs will seem a little OP but normal is so easy, you are already strolling through the game so a little easier won’t make a big difference. The idea came from playing MMOs where you eat raid food before a big fight for a stat buff that lasts 30 minutes or more. The food buffs are all 30 minutes and the drink buffs are 12 minutes.

Food Buff 1
Health, Magicka, Stamina Regeneration: +25% for 30 minutes. Stews and Soups produce this effect.

Food Buff 2
Health, Magicka, Stamina Regeneration: +15% for 30 minutes. Jerky, sandwiches and salads produce this effect.

Drink Buff 1
Fire, Shock, Frost resistance: +15% for 12 minutes. Nordic Coffee produces this effect.

Drink Buff 2
Poison resistance: +25% for 12 minutes. Nordic Tea produces this effect.

Drink Buff 3
Magic resistance: +15% for 12 minutes. Nordic Red Apple Ale and Nordic Red Apple Wine produce this effect.

Drink Buff 4
Armor Increase: +50 for 12 minutes. Nordic Green Apple Ale produces this effect.

Drink Buff 5
Nighteye Effect: 5 minutes. Nordic Carrot Juice produces this effect.

Drink Buff 6
Health, Stamina and Magicka Increase: 25pts for 12 minutes. Nordic Green Apple Wine produces this effect.

Special Buff
Cure all diseases, Health Regeneration +10% for 30 minutes: Nordic Chicken Soup produces this.

You can consume more than one item at a time for different effects but the same buffs do not stack.

Compatibility
No vanilla items were altered so the general compatibility is very good. Nordic Cooking won't hurt other mods or your save.

iNeed Users
The current version of iNeed supports Nordic Cooking so my meals will relieve hunger and thirst. Just download the main file titled Nordic Cooking. That's all you need for Vanilla or if you use iNeed. The file has no dependencies. iNeed supports food mods within its very clever scripting system.

If you use some other needs mod the meals and drinks will not interfere with them but likely won't affect hunger/thirst either.

I use iNeed in my game and the latest version of it works great.

Frostfall 3.3.1
Added keywords for FF support. Soups and hot drinks will add warmth. Frostfall NOT required. It just has a brilliant keyword system.

Installation
Use your favorite mod manager. It’s just an esp file for your data folder.

Load Order
Put it high in your load order. The only interior cell I edited is The Sleeping Giant Inn to place the cookbook on a table. But when you edit a cell you the vanilla lighting records become part of the esp. So put it above any interior lighting mods so the lighting records for that cell don't get over-written by my mod. This is a good rule of them for lighting mods. I don't know why that's hardly ever mentioned. I put all my lighting mods as close to the bottom of the load order as I can.

  1. Put any food/drink from this mod (they all start with the word Nordic) in a place that the game will delete (a dead body for instance).
  2. Wait until any buff from the mod is off. Check the Magic panel for buffs with the names starting with “Nordic” as in Nordic Beef Stew. Wait until any of those buffs time out. None last longer than 30 minutes.
  3. Save your game.
  4. Exit.
  5. Deactivate or manually delete NordicCooking.esp from your data folder.
  6. Play on.

Cleaned and error checked in SSEedit.

Credits
Thanks to Bethesda for the wisdom of letting us mod their brilliant game. I wonder how many thousands of additional copies of Skyrim have sold over the years because the game can be modded into new and interesting experiences.

The Nexus Modding Community. This is a great place to enjoy games to their full potential but it’s also a great place to get advice and help from other modders.

Isoku for offering to include support for the food in his awesome iNeed mod.

Permissions
Contact me for permissions use my work in your work. Patches are allowed without permissions.

Recipes
Meals that produce Buff 1[/b]
(Health, Magicka, Stamina Regeneration: +25% for 30 minutes)

Nordic Roasted Goat
1 Leg of Goat
1 Leek
1 Green Apple

Nordic Roasted Gourd
1 Gourd
1 Leek
1 Red Apple

Nordic Roasted Chicken
1 Chicken Breast
1 Leek
1 Red Apple

Nordic Beef Stew
1 Raw Beef
1 Potato
1 Tomato

Nordic Horker Stew
1 Horker Meat
1 Potato
1 Tomato

Nordic Cheese Soup
1 Goat Cheese Wheel or Eidar Cheese Wheel or Mammoth Cheese Bowl
1 Leek
1 Potato

Nordic Clam Chowder
1 Clam Meet
1 Tomato
1 Potato

Nordic Venison Stew
1 Venison
1 Potato
1 Alto Wine or Wine

Nordic Veggie Stew
1 Potato
1 Tomato
1 Carrot

Meals that produce Buff 2
(Health, Magicka, Stamina Regeneration: +15% for 30 minutes)

Nordic Salmon Salad
1 Salmon
1 Cabbage
1 Goat Cheese

Nordic Salad
1 Cabbage
1 Tomato
1 Carrot

Nordic Mammoth Cheese Steak
1 Mammoth Snout
1 Mammoth Cheese Bowl
1 Bread

Nordic Cheese Hero
1 Goat Cheese Wedge or Eidar Cheese Wedge
1 Bread

Nordic Veggie Hero
1 Cabbage
1 Tomato
1 Bread

Nordic Smoked Salmon
1 Salmon
1 Red Apple
1 Leek

Nordic Hash
1 Raw Rabbit Leg
1 Raw Pheasant Breast
1 Potato

Nordic Jerky
1 Venison
1 Leek
1 Red Apple

Special Meals

Nordic Chicken Soup (cures all diseases, regenerates health)
1 Chicken Breast
1 Leek
1 Alto Wine

Nordic Coffee
1 Juniper Berries
1 Snowberries

Nordic Tea
1 Blue Mountain Flower (mostly up north)
1 Red Mountain Flower (lots of places)
1 Purple Mountain Flower (lots of places)

Nordic Green Apple Ale
1 Green Apple
1 Ale

Nordic Red Apple Cider
1 Red Apple
1 Nord Mead


Antique Roman Dishes - Collection

The book I have is edited and translated from Latin by Robert Maier. My humble person only translated the German translations into English. I hope the recipes are still rather near to the originals.

First I have to introduce you to some native Roman ingredients, such as:

-- Caroenum: Boiled must (you have to boil the new wine or grape juice until it is only half the amount you started with).

-- Defritum: Either thick fIg syrup, or must that's boiled until you have only a third of the amount with which you started.

-- Liebstoeckl: I didn't find an English translation. In Latin it's called 'levisticum officinale'. It's an umbelliferous plant with yellowish flowers. Its dried roots are used as spice. It seems to be a kind of celery.

-- Liquamen: a salty fish sauce. Most of the time you can replace it by salt.

-- Passum: Very sweet wine sauce, made by boiling the must (new wine or grape juice) to thicken it. (maybe add honey? - just my guess)

-- Poleiminze: A kind of mint that's growing in inundated areas. Just replace it by ordinary mint.

-- Saturei: I didn't find an English translation. In Latin it's called 'satureia hortensis'. It's a violet or white flowered kind of labiate plants which grows mainly in Southern Europe. It's used as a spice plant, especially for bean dishes.

-- Silphium: Its other names are 'Laser' or 'ferula asa foetida'. I've noticed that it's also called 'hing' in the Indian cuisine. It is an onion and garlic substitute and should be used rather sparingly because of its very strong taste and smell.

And here are some useful conversions, taken from the FAQ maintained by [email protected] (great job!)

And now let's come to the meals. All of those are calculated for 4 servings!

Unfortunately the exact cooking temperatures and times haven't been handed down in all cases. You have to rely on your gut feeling. But I hope you enjoy all of it nonetheless!


Frying, boiling and steaming

Even if you only have a small stove or cooker with a couple of hotplates, you can cook delicious food at home. You can fry meat, fish or eggs in a frying pan with oil or butter. You can also chop or slice vegetables and sauté or stir-fry them in a pan or a wok. Another way of cooking vegetables and grains like rice is by boiling or steaming them. You can peel vegetables like potatoes and carrots before cooking them, and even mash them after they're cooked if you like. You can also boil other foods like spaghetti, eggs and certain meats, or steam fish and other seafood like crabs and mussels.

With a simple hotplate you can also make soups and stews. The ingredients for these often include diced meats and vegetables as well as a pinch of salt. You can also sprinkle in spices like pepper or paprika or add herbs like basil or parsley. You can even make sauces by melting butter in a saucepan and mixing in flour and milk before adding other ingredients like grated cheese and then stirring until your sauce is smooth.


The Old and Original Recipe for Aebleskiver

This recipe for Aebleskiver is the one my parents used to make homemade Aebleskiver when I was a child, and it's the one I use today.

The first Aebleskiver were originally cooked with small pieces of apples or sometimes applesauce as filling, from there they got their name. However, in the modern Danish kitchen these filling are not included anymore and haven't been for the past many year. For us this is the most original recipe for Aebleskiver, it's super delicious and relatively easy to make.

This is one of our best Christmas traditions and we always makes them several times during the Christmas holidays. Most of the times we stick with our traditional recipe but sometimes we add different kinds of filling inside the Aebleskiver. This filling is added during the frying process.

As filling, we have used chocolate chips, small apple pieces or different variations of jam.


8. Chinese BBQ Pork (Char Siu)

Chinese BBQ Pork (Char Siu)

Chinese Name: 蜜汁叉烧肉 mì zhī chā shāo ròu
Flavor: light sweet
Ingredients: pork butt, Char Siu sauce, honey, sugar, garlics.
Cooking Methods: roast

Brush Char Siu sauce, honey and cooking wine on the pork strips evenly. Pack the pork in fresh-keeping bags and put in refrigerator to marinate for 12 hours. Then, brush some Char Siu sauce and honey again and roast the pork in oven with 250℃ (480℉) for 15 minutes. Take the pork out and again brush some Char Siu sauce and honey and keep roasting for 15 minutes more. And then, you can dice the pork and enjoy it.


Community Reviews

I have a large shelf of cookery books but there&aposs nothing remotely &aposNordic&apos about any of them. So I was curious to have a good look through this one.
I ordered it in from our local Library service and the first thing I noticed was the sheer size and weight of it - nearly 750 pages and massive! I can&apost help thinking that the size is somehow proving some sort of point?
Does someone who is bothering to read a Nordic cookbook need to be told (and I quote) &aposovercooked broccoli is just not very nice&apos? I have a large shelf of cookery books but there's nothing remotely 'Nordic' about any of them. So I was curious to have a good look through this one.
I ordered it in from our local Library service and the first thing I noticed was the sheer size and weight of it - nearly 750 pages and massive! I can't help thinking that the size is somehow proving some sort of point?
Does someone who is bothering to read a Nordic cookbook need to be told (and I quote) 'overcooked broccoli is just not very nice'? Or that putting soup in a blender makes it smoother?
It even told you how to cook Brussels sprouts (boil in salted water for 10 minutes, or in my mother's case, two hours).
I could quote dozens of other examples of comments that are just so obvious they surely don't need to be said!
However, after the disappointment of the vegetable section, I was totally enthralled by the meat and fish recipes. 4 examples -

Boiled Seal intestines with blubber and crowberries
Roasted or braised Northern Fulmar chicks
Boiled or braised pilot whale
Puffin stuffed with cake

Now surely some of these are endangered species? I'm trying to think about the reaction if puffin appeared on a menu in England (where they are on the Amber List of endangered birds).
So yes, an interesting read but I won't be spending £30 to own this, and some of the recipes definitely made me feel very uncomfortable. . more

The Nordic Cookbook by famed Swedish Chef Magnus Nilsson is expansive to a point where you could swap out the Joy of Cooking (or any other vast cooking reference book) for this tome of cooking techniques and recipes. Do you want to know how to hardboil an egg? Nordic Cookbook has you covered. Need to make some mayonnaise? This book has a recipe for that too. Want to serve Rotten Shark and Smoking Fish Over Sheep’s Dung to your friends and family, you evil bastard? Then you should probably read T The Nordic Cookbook by famed Swedish Chef Magnus Nilsson is expansive to a point where you could swap out the Joy of Cooking (or any other vast cooking reference book) for this tome of cooking techniques and recipes. Do you want to know how to hardboil an egg? Nordic Cookbook has you covered. Need to make some mayonnaise? This book has a recipe for that too. Want to serve Rotten Shark and Smoking Fish Over Sheep’s Dung to your friends and family, you evil bastard? Then you should probably read The Nordic Cookbook.

This is the first massive, reference-style, survey of an entire culinary tradition, book that I’ve ever read cover to cover, but I’m really glad I did. Nilsson shares his experience with this tradition not through the eyes of a professional chef, but through someone deeply passionate about the Nordic culture and the family recipes that have been passed down over hundreds of years. It is clear how much love and effort went into making this cookbook, and the lessons I learned from its 700ish pages can be easily applied to much of my own home cooking.

As for the recipes themselves, as a technical matter, I occasionally found some of the directions to be weirdly specific, “Arrange the fish…in the position it swims when alive” or dangerously spare, as in the case of many of the pickling and preserving recipes that seem to lack steps for sanitation processes other than sending lutefisk samples to a chemist to make sure what you’ve made isn’t full of botulism.

Another issue that I found across every recipe that I tried from this book is that its cooking times/temps are oddly, obviously way off. It wasn’t much of a hindrance for me since I cook quite a lot, but more of a novice home cook could get salmonella when roasting a chicken for only 20 minutes at 200 °F. And maybe Swedes really like watery potato soup, but I had to cook mine down over an hour to get the right consistency instead of the 20ish minutes stated in the recipe. Another recipe for a beef stew would have had me roast the beef to a solid brick of coal if I had left it in the dutch oven for as long as it recommended.

I find these mistakes puzzling, but I am willing to overlook them because, at the end of the day, the audacity of this book is just so damned charming. And, if I’ve learned anything from The Nordic Cookbook, I now know how to prepare a puffin if I can ever catch one of those liar penguins.
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I love this cookbook! It was a holiday gift to me, and so thoughtful and perfect!

I&aposve only started browsing through it as it deserves, but have already- in less than a week!- made 2 recipes from it. Both the julekaka (a Norwegian Christmas bread that&aposs a holiday tradition around here), and the red cabbage with apples which we just has with our Yuletide roast goose, turned out perfectly. And since our local Scandinavian store closed, I am eager to try making rye crispbread, lefse, and other thing I love this cookbook! It was a holiday gift to me, and so thoughtful and perfect!

I've only started browsing through it as it deserves, but have already- in less than a week!- made 2 recipes from it. Both the julekaka (a Norwegian Christmas bread that's a holiday tradition around here), and the red cabbage with apples which we just has with our Yuletide roast goose, turned out perfectly. And since our local Scandinavian store closed, I am eager to try making rye crispbread, lefse, and other things!

And, someday, I will even make lutefisk from scratch.

Anyway- if you have a Scandinavian heritage, or it's a part of your family- this is a thorough look at what the historic foods of the Nordic countries are, and most are quite accessible and look delicious.

I am completely thrilled by it, and I haven't even started to browse the pastry recipes!

Very recommended for people who have an interest, including in historic foods. . more

This book will teach you everything from how to boil eggs to what to do with whale! While this is called a cookbook (and certainly is with 700+ recipes!), it also a look at Nordic food culture and traditions. No, I’m not going to catch a puffin and stuff it with cake. No, I’m not interested in cooking with seal intestines. But I don’t know if the author expects us to try everything. And before you get turned off this book, know that for every one recipe I know I won’t make, there are another d This book will teach you everything from how to boil eggs to what to do with whale! While this is called a cookbook (and certainly is with 700+ recipes!), it also a look at Nordic food culture and traditions. No, I’m not going to catch a puffin and stuff it with cake. No, I’m not interested in cooking with seal intestines. But I don’t know if the author expects us to try everything. And before you get turned off this book, know that for every one recipe I know I won’t make, there are another dozen (at least!) recipes I can’t wait to have a go at! The soups, cereals, and baked goods sections provided more than enough to keep me busy in my kitchen for months. Never mind the recipes for various meat, fish, poultry, and game. All very do-able and delicious-sounding.

Aside from the recipes, his cultural explanations were well written and the photos were gorgeous. I read this cover to cover like I would any other book and have tabs (too many to count!) sticking out marking things I want to try.

Highly recommend for anyone interested in food culture and recipes of the Nordic regions.
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This book is beyond comprehensive, offering a full range of recipes from all across the Nordic region. There&aposs also a fair bit of history and background to the recipes and cuisine/food culture. The book does slant somewhat toward Swedish, but that&aposs not surprising given that the author is Swedish.

The quality is a little more mixed. A lot of Nordic cooking is simple, and many of the recipes reflect. More than a few recipes boil down to "take a piece of meat, add some vegetables, salt, and some s This book is beyond comprehensive, offering a full range of recipes from all across the Nordic region. There's also a fair bit of history and background to the recipes and cuisine/food culture. The book does slant somewhat toward Swedish, but that's not surprising given that the author is Swedish.

The quality is a little more mixed. A lot of Nordic cooking is simple, and many of the recipes reflect. More than a few recipes boil down to "take a piece of meat, add some vegetables, salt, and some seasonings, and cook it". It's authentic, but some readers may be disappointed that there isn't more "pizazz".
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Do you also read 700 page cookbooks cover to cover when the seasons change to cold and the world is a dark place and you just want to look at pictures of deeeeep rural Norway and read about how to cook sheep colostrum? Fun! Me too.

This is the second time I&aposve read this cookbook and it is my favorite cookbook of all time. Do you also read 700 page cookbooks cover to cover when the seasons change to cold and the world is a dark place and you just want to look at pictures of deeeeep rural Norway and read about how to cook sheep colostrum? Fun! Me too.

This is the second time I've read this cookbook and it is my favorite cookbook of all time. . more

I have owned this book now for three years. Have I cooked anything out of it? A few things, yes, and they were delicious. I have made potato porridge, glogg, a few baked goods, and meatballs from this book, as well as used some of his recipes as foundations on which to build other dishes. It&aposs one of the ones I reach for if I want to make something "staple".

But while the food I&aposve managed to recreate from these recipes is wonderful, the five star rating I have given this book is purely based on I have owned this book now for three years. Have I cooked anything out of it? A few things, yes, and they were delicious. I have made potato porridge, glogg, a few baked goods, and meatballs from this book, as well as used some of his recipes as foundations on which to build other dishes. It's one of the ones I reach for if I want to make something "staple".

But while the food I've managed to recreate from these recipes is wonderful, the five star rating I have given this book is purely based on the respect due to Magnus Nilsson for putting it together in the first place. This huge cookbook represents years of passion, expertise, research, and devotion to his region's cuisine that you would be hard-pressed to find anywhere else. There is history here, and love, and true craftsmanship. The photos and anecdotes are lovely, and the sheer breadth of recipes on display here is truly impressive. This might not be the best choice of cookbook if you're looking for a Nordic-food primer--it's a little too overwhelming for that--but if you love regional food and what it says about a culture and what that culture says about humanity as a whole, you will likely adore this book the way I do.

It will take me a year to really read this cookbook, but in the few short weeks it has been in my library I have relished the photos, enjoyed Nilsson&aposs story behind writing the book, and made the Icelandic Oatmeal pancakes weekly. There are countless recipes here to try, including Icelandic Fish & Potato Mash (appears to be the amazing dish I had on our travels to Iceland) an Pepparkakor, which are a Swedish version of Gingerbread cookies. My son flagged this recipe, out of 739 pages -- the cook It will take me a year to really read this cookbook, but in the few short weeks it has been in my library I have relished the photos, enjoyed Nilsson's story behind writing the book, and made the Icelandic Oatmeal pancakes weekly. There are countless recipes here to try, including Icelandic Fish & Potato Mash (appears to be the amazing dish I had on our travels to Iceland) an Pepparkakor, which are a Swedish version of Gingerbread cookies. My son flagged this recipe, out of 739 pages -- the cookie was a favorite of my late father, whom my son never knew.

The cookbook contains a recipe with variations among the Nordic countries: Greenland, Iceland, Faroe Islands, Denmark, Norway, Sweden and Finland. The same meal may have slight ingredient or preparation style from country to country.

Well worth the $50 price-tag. And I've already made a note to purchase Nilsson's The Nordic Baking Book, scheduled for release October 2019 (at about 400 pages only). . more

I forget that cookbooks are on goodreads. This is the best cookbook I’ve ever come across in my life. INCREDIBLY beautiful.

Magnus used his fame and tracked down pieces of dying culinary cultural heritage from Scandinavia. You’ll never find a more complete and comprehensive cookbook reflecting the beauty food history of the nordics. It’s become known as the scandi food bible. I genuinely appreciate Nilsonn’s incredible work and passion put into this. There are some recipes I don’t think I’ll eve I forget that cookbooks are on goodreads. This is the best cookbook I’ve ever come across in my life. INCREDIBLY beautiful.

Magnus used his fame and tracked down pieces of dying culinary cultural heritage from Scandinavia. You’ll never find a more complete and comprehensive cookbook reflecting the beauty food history of the nordics. It’s become known as the scandi food bible. I genuinely appreciate Nilsonn’s incredible work and passion put into this. There are some recipes I don’t think I’ll ever be brave enough to try or taste, but the majority are accessible if you can find yourself through the kitchen with some proficiency.

This is one of my most prized possessions and anyone on the fence about purchasing should definitely purchase it. . more

Includes recipes for lampreys, puffins, whole sheep&aposs heads, and testicles. Challenged me to appreciate the ingenuity and diversity of the culture and not just be weirded out by some of these recipes.

Not all are as startling. There are soups, vegetables, many sweets, as well as breads and pancakes. MADE WITH BLOOD!

Fun and informative, with beautiful photography. Includes recipes for lampreys, puffins, whole sheep's heads, and testicles. Challenged me to appreciate the ingenuity and diversity of the culture and not just be weirded out by some of these recipes.

Not all are as startling. There are soups, vegetables, many sweets, as well as breads and pancakes. MADE WITH BLOOD!

Fun and informative, with beautiful photography. . more

Huge, massive as a hardback, this is an reference work masquerading as a coffeetable cooking-art book.

Name it, either in one of the Scandinavian languages or English, and you will find it here.

When I pre-requested “The Nordic Cookbook” prior to its arrival at the library, I didn’t check the page count. Although oversize format is not unusual for cookbooks, this 767-page volume was quite a surprise. It’s the largest cookbook I’ve ever worked with, and navigating its bulk for cooking purposes is challenging, though somewhat mitigated by its two bound-in bookmarks. Author Magnus Nilsson is head chef at the top Zagat-rated Swedish restaurant Fäviken, but this is much more than a cookbook. When I pre-requested “The Nordic Cookbook” prior to its arrival at the library, I didn’t check the page count. Although oversize format is not unusual for cookbooks, this 767-page volume was quite a surprise. It’s the largest cookbook I’ve ever worked with, and navigating its bulk for cooking purposes is challenging, though somewhat mitigated by its two bound-in bookmarks. Author Magnus Nilsson is head chef at the top Zagat-rated Swedish restaurant Fäviken, but this is much more than a cookbook. It’s the history and anthropology of Scandinavia discussed through traditional foods, with recipes to illustrate the discourse. Nilsson includes not only the popular countries—Sweden, Norway, Denmark, and Finland—but also the Faroe Islands, Iceland, and even Greenland. The author’s landscape and people photos provide a context for his writing, setting the mood and depicting the traditions of these cold and starkly beautiful countries.

The recipes are not geared towards Americans, but towards Scandinavians and those who appreciate them. Not all can be reproduced in an American kitchen. Ingredients such as woodcock, sprats, seabird eggs, seal, reindeer, and pilot whale are native to specific areas of Scandinavia and simply not available elsewhere. Such recipes provide a peek into a different way of living and eating, in harsher, more remote environments where the growing season is short and imported goods rare and costly. Other recipes, like Swedish lutefisk and Icelandic rotten shark, are part of Scandinavian cultures that are considered less than delicious elsewhere.

Still, many dishes can be made and enjoyed in an American kitchen. Vinaigrette cabbage salad traditionally accompanies pizza in Sweden, and is a healthful addition worth considering for pizza night. Carrot soup, potato pancakes, sweet and sour braised red cabbage, fresh cucumber pickles, Swedish meatballs, smoked homemade sausages, and beef and vegetable soup with dumplings, for example, would be enjoyed by most Americans. And of course, the sweets—such as Danish pastries, Norwegian Christmas cake, strawberry layer cake, fruit soup, and Finnish almond rum torte—are much loved throughout the world. Many of the sauces will interest the American palate, like egg sauce for fish, dill mayonnaise, horseradish sauce, and citronette and berry sauces. Finally, beverages such as aquavit, mulled wine, and gløgg have universal appeal, especially in cold weather.

Anyone who is interested in Scandinavian culture beyond the countries commonly covered by the media will be pleased to read this book. Those of Scandinavian descent might be particularly interested. People who want to learn about historical and contemporary Scandinavian foods will of course enjoy it. Readers who want more in-depth discussion of native Scandinavian foods than is available in the usual Scandinavian cookbooks will appreciate the effort that Nilsson put into his research as well as his straightforward and concise, yet personal and appealing writing style.
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