Cocktail Recipes, Spirits, and Local Bars

Pink Slime Now Increasing Beef Prices

Pink Slime Now Increasing Beef Prices


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Or rather, the demand for pink slime-less beef is increasing the price of high-quality cuts

Well, here's some not-so-good news: In the effort to cut out pink slime from beef products, prices for beef have gone up, and just in time for grilling season.

The good news? Reuters reports that smaller butchers selling high-quality meats are getting more customers due to the pink slime scare.

Even meat-slinging giant Cargill is reverting back to hand-carving meat out of the carcass trimmings to salvage lean bits to grind, rather than creating the "lean, finely textured beef" of sliminess.

Of course, this means that the top-grade lean beef cuts have historically high prices this month, while fattier trimmings (formerly used for pink slime) are cheaper than ever. According to government data, the average retail price for ground beef was $3.02 a pound in March, while the average price was just $2.24 two years ago. Now we're wondering what all this talk of meat glue will do to our summer cookouts.


McDonald’s Drops ‘Pink Slime’ From Hamburger Meat

Related

For years, the world’s leading fast-food chain used a “pink slime” as beef filler for its burgers in the U.S. After a campaign by celebrity chef Jamie Oliver, McDonald’s has abandoned the goo.

Oliver, who stars in his own TV show “Jamie Oliver’s Food Revolution,” has been campaigning for months to get fast-food chains to stop using the pink slime, which is technically discarded beef cuts treated with ammonium hydroxide.

While it’s approved by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, it’s still rather stomach-turning. The goo became better known after Oliver highlighted it on his show, demonstrating how it’s made from scraps that are soaked in ammonium hydroxide and then ground into a pinkish form that looks something like hamburger meat.

McDonald’s has confirmed that it has stopped use the stuff, even as The Daily has reported that the Agriculture Department plans to buy 7 million pounds of it for public school cafeterias in the next several months.

McDonald’s recently released a statement saying that at the beginning of last year, “we made a decision to discontinue to the use of ammonia-treated beef in our hamburgers,” but it has only been widely reported within the last few days. McDonald’s denies that Oliver’s show had anything to do with halting the practice, and it does appear that they stopped using it before Oliver’s show aired in April.

The USDA actually contends that beef scraps treated with ammonia hydroxide is “generally recognized as safe,” but when you actually see what it’s like, you might think differently. Oliver tried to get the stuff, which he says is in 70% of U.S. beef, out of both fast food restaurants and public school cafeterias.

It’s unclear whether McDonald’s is able to drop the practice without it costing the fast-food chain more to make its burgers. But for those who eat at McDonald’s because they see it as the most cost-effective way to eat — a dubious reason, to say the least — it’s a good thing the company has halted the practice.


McDonald’s Drops ‘Pink Slime’ From Hamburger Meat

Related

For years, the world’s leading fast-food chain used a “pink slime” as beef filler for its burgers in the U.S. After a campaign by celebrity chef Jamie Oliver, McDonald’s has abandoned the goo.

Oliver, who stars in his own TV show “Jamie Oliver’s Food Revolution,” has been campaigning for months to get fast-food chains to stop using the pink slime, which is technically discarded beef cuts treated with ammonium hydroxide.

While it’s approved by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, it’s still rather stomach-turning. The goo became better known after Oliver highlighted it on his show, demonstrating how it’s made from scraps that are soaked in ammonium hydroxide and then ground into a pinkish form that looks something like hamburger meat.

McDonald’s has confirmed that it has stopped use the stuff, even as The Daily has reported that the Agriculture Department plans to buy 7 million pounds of it for public school cafeterias in the next several months.

McDonald’s recently released a statement saying that at the beginning of last year, “we made a decision to discontinue to the use of ammonia-treated beef in our hamburgers,” but it has only been widely reported within the last few days. McDonald’s denies that Oliver’s show had anything to do with halting the practice, and it does appear that they stopped using it before Oliver’s show aired in April.

The USDA actually contends that beef scraps treated with ammonia hydroxide is “generally recognized as safe,” but when you actually see what it’s like, you might think differently. Oliver tried to get the stuff, which he says is in 70% of U.S. beef, out of both fast food restaurants and public school cafeterias.

It’s unclear whether McDonald’s is able to drop the practice without it costing the fast-food chain more to make its burgers. But for those who eat at McDonald’s because they see it as the most cost-effective way to eat — a dubious reason, to say the least — it’s a good thing the company has halted the practice.


McDonald’s Drops ‘Pink Slime’ From Hamburger Meat

Related

For years, the world’s leading fast-food chain used a “pink slime” as beef filler for its burgers in the U.S. After a campaign by celebrity chef Jamie Oliver, McDonald’s has abandoned the goo.

Oliver, who stars in his own TV show “Jamie Oliver’s Food Revolution,” has been campaigning for months to get fast-food chains to stop using the pink slime, which is technically discarded beef cuts treated with ammonium hydroxide.

While it’s approved by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, it’s still rather stomach-turning. The goo became better known after Oliver highlighted it on his show, demonstrating how it’s made from scraps that are soaked in ammonium hydroxide and then ground into a pinkish form that looks something like hamburger meat.

McDonald’s has confirmed that it has stopped use the stuff, even as The Daily has reported that the Agriculture Department plans to buy 7 million pounds of it for public school cafeterias in the next several months.

McDonald’s recently released a statement saying that at the beginning of last year, “we made a decision to discontinue to the use of ammonia-treated beef in our hamburgers,” but it has only been widely reported within the last few days. McDonald’s denies that Oliver’s show had anything to do with halting the practice, and it does appear that they stopped using it before Oliver’s show aired in April.

The USDA actually contends that beef scraps treated with ammonia hydroxide is “generally recognized as safe,” but when you actually see what it’s like, you might think differently. Oliver tried to get the stuff, which he says is in 70% of U.S. beef, out of both fast food restaurants and public school cafeterias.

It’s unclear whether McDonald’s is able to drop the practice without it costing the fast-food chain more to make its burgers. But for those who eat at McDonald’s because they see it as the most cost-effective way to eat — a dubious reason, to say the least — it’s a good thing the company has halted the practice.


McDonald’s Drops ‘Pink Slime’ From Hamburger Meat

Related

For years, the world’s leading fast-food chain used a “pink slime” as beef filler for its burgers in the U.S. After a campaign by celebrity chef Jamie Oliver, McDonald’s has abandoned the goo.

Oliver, who stars in his own TV show “Jamie Oliver’s Food Revolution,” has been campaigning for months to get fast-food chains to stop using the pink slime, which is technically discarded beef cuts treated with ammonium hydroxide.

While it’s approved by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, it’s still rather stomach-turning. The goo became better known after Oliver highlighted it on his show, demonstrating how it’s made from scraps that are soaked in ammonium hydroxide and then ground into a pinkish form that looks something like hamburger meat.

McDonald’s has confirmed that it has stopped use the stuff, even as The Daily has reported that the Agriculture Department plans to buy 7 million pounds of it for public school cafeterias in the next several months.

McDonald’s recently released a statement saying that at the beginning of last year, “we made a decision to discontinue to the use of ammonia-treated beef in our hamburgers,” but it has only been widely reported within the last few days. McDonald’s denies that Oliver’s show had anything to do with halting the practice, and it does appear that they stopped using it before Oliver’s show aired in April.

The USDA actually contends that beef scraps treated with ammonia hydroxide is “generally recognized as safe,” but when you actually see what it’s like, you might think differently. Oliver tried to get the stuff, which he says is in 70% of U.S. beef, out of both fast food restaurants and public school cafeterias.

It’s unclear whether McDonald’s is able to drop the practice without it costing the fast-food chain more to make its burgers. But for those who eat at McDonald’s because they see it as the most cost-effective way to eat — a dubious reason, to say the least — it’s a good thing the company has halted the practice.


McDonald’s Drops ‘Pink Slime’ From Hamburger Meat

Related

For years, the world’s leading fast-food chain used a “pink slime” as beef filler for its burgers in the U.S. After a campaign by celebrity chef Jamie Oliver, McDonald’s has abandoned the goo.

Oliver, who stars in his own TV show “Jamie Oliver’s Food Revolution,” has been campaigning for months to get fast-food chains to stop using the pink slime, which is technically discarded beef cuts treated with ammonium hydroxide.

While it’s approved by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, it’s still rather stomach-turning. The goo became better known after Oliver highlighted it on his show, demonstrating how it’s made from scraps that are soaked in ammonium hydroxide and then ground into a pinkish form that looks something like hamburger meat.

McDonald’s has confirmed that it has stopped use the stuff, even as The Daily has reported that the Agriculture Department plans to buy 7 million pounds of it for public school cafeterias in the next several months.

McDonald’s recently released a statement saying that at the beginning of last year, “we made a decision to discontinue to the use of ammonia-treated beef in our hamburgers,” but it has only been widely reported within the last few days. McDonald’s denies that Oliver’s show had anything to do with halting the practice, and it does appear that they stopped using it before Oliver’s show aired in April.

The USDA actually contends that beef scraps treated with ammonia hydroxide is “generally recognized as safe,” but when you actually see what it’s like, you might think differently. Oliver tried to get the stuff, which he says is in 70% of U.S. beef, out of both fast food restaurants and public school cafeterias.

It’s unclear whether McDonald’s is able to drop the practice without it costing the fast-food chain more to make its burgers. But for those who eat at McDonald’s because they see it as the most cost-effective way to eat — a dubious reason, to say the least — it’s a good thing the company has halted the practice.


McDonald’s Drops ‘Pink Slime’ From Hamburger Meat

Related

For years, the world’s leading fast-food chain used a “pink slime” as beef filler for its burgers in the U.S. After a campaign by celebrity chef Jamie Oliver, McDonald’s has abandoned the goo.

Oliver, who stars in his own TV show “Jamie Oliver’s Food Revolution,” has been campaigning for months to get fast-food chains to stop using the pink slime, which is technically discarded beef cuts treated with ammonium hydroxide.

While it’s approved by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, it’s still rather stomach-turning. The goo became better known after Oliver highlighted it on his show, demonstrating how it’s made from scraps that are soaked in ammonium hydroxide and then ground into a pinkish form that looks something like hamburger meat.

McDonald’s has confirmed that it has stopped use the stuff, even as The Daily has reported that the Agriculture Department plans to buy 7 million pounds of it for public school cafeterias in the next several months.

McDonald’s recently released a statement saying that at the beginning of last year, “we made a decision to discontinue to the use of ammonia-treated beef in our hamburgers,” but it has only been widely reported within the last few days. McDonald’s denies that Oliver’s show had anything to do with halting the practice, and it does appear that they stopped using it before Oliver’s show aired in April.

The USDA actually contends that beef scraps treated with ammonia hydroxide is “generally recognized as safe,” but when you actually see what it’s like, you might think differently. Oliver tried to get the stuff, which he says is in 70% of U.S. beef, out of both fast food restaurants and public school cafeterias.

It’s unclear whether McDonald’s is able to drop the practice without it costing the fast-food chain more to make its burgers. But for those who eat at McDonald’s because they see it as the most cost-effective way to eat — a dubious reason, to say the least — it’s a good thing the company has halted the practice.


McDonald’s Drops ‘Pink Slime’ From Hamburger Meat

Related

For years, the world’s leading fast-food chain used a “pink slime” as beef filler for its burgers in the U.S. After a campaign by celebrity chef Jamie Oliver, McDonald’s has abandoned the goo.

Oliver, who stars in his own TV show “Jamie Oliver’s Food Revolution,” has been campaigning for months to get fast-food chains to stop using the pink slime, which is technically discarded beef cuts treated with ammonium hydroxide.

While it’s approved by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, it’s still rather stomach-turning. The goo became better known after Oliver highlighted it on his show, demonstrating how it’s made from scraps that are soaked in ammonium hydroxide and then ground into a pinkish form that looks something like hamburger meat.

McDonald’s has confirmed that it has stopped use the stuff, even as The Daily has reported that the Agriculture Department plans to buy 7 million pounds of it for public school cafeterias in the next several months.

McDonald’s recently released a statement saying that at the beginning of last year, “we made a decision to discontinue to the use of ammonia-treated beef in our hamburgers,” but it has only been widely reported within the last few days. McDonald’s denies that Oliver’s show had anything to do with halting the practice, and it does appear that they stopped using it before Oliver’s show aired in April.

The USDA actually contends that beef scraps treated with ammonia hydroxide is “generally recognized as safe,” but when you actually see what it’s like, you might think differently. Oliver tried to get the stuff, which he says is in 70% of U.S. beef, out of both fast food restaurants and public school cafeterias.

It’s unclear whether McDonald’s is able to drop the practice without it costing the fast-food chain more to make its burgers. But for those who eat at McDonald’s because they see it as the most cost-effective way to eat — a dubious reason, to say the least — it’s a good thing the company has halted the practice.


McDonald’s Drops ‘Pink Slime’ From Hamburger Meat

Related

For years, the world’s leading fast-food chain used a “pink slime” as beef filler for its burgers in the U.S. After a campaign by celebrity chef Jamie Oliver, McDonald’s has abandoned the goo.

Oliver, who stars in his own TV show “Jamie Oliver’s Food Revolution,” has been campaigning for months to get fast-food chains to stop using the pink slime, which is technically discarded beef cuts treated with ammonium hydroxide.

While it’s approved by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, it’s still rather stomach-turning. The goo became better known after Oliver highlighted it on his show, demonstrating how it’s made from scraps that are soaked in ammonium hydroxide and then ground into a pinkish form that looks something like hamburger meat.

McDonald’s has confirmed that it has stopped use the stuff, even as The Daily has reported that the Agriculture Department plans to buy 7 million pounds of it for public school cafeterias in the next several months.

McDonald’s recently released a statement saying that at the beginning of last year, “we made a decision to discontinue to the use of ammonia-treated beef in our hamburgers,” but it has only been widely reported within the last few days. McDonald’s denies that Oliver’s show had anything to do with halting the practice, and it does appear that they stopped using it before Oliver’s show aired in April.

The USDA actually contends that beef scraps treated with ammonia hydroxide is “generally recognized as safe,” but when you actually see what it’s like, you might think differently. Oliver tried to get the stuff, which he says is in 70% of U.S. beef, out of both fast food restaurants and public school cafeterias.

It’s unclear whether McDonald’s is able to drop the practice without it costing the fast-food chain more to make its burgers. But for those who eat at McDonald’s because they see it as the most cost-effective way to eat — a dubious reason, to say the least — it’s a good thing the company has halted the practice.


McDonald’s Drops ‘Pink Slime’ From Hamburger Meat

Related

For years, the world’s leading fast-food chain used a “pink slime” as beef filler for its burgers in the U.S. After a campaign by celebrity chef Jamie Oliver, McDonald’s has abandoned the goo.

Oliver, who stars in his own TV show “Jamie Oliver’s Food Revolution,” has been campaigning for months to get fast-food chains to stop using the pink slime, which is technically discarded beef cuts treated with ammonium hydroxide.

While it’s approved by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, it’s still rather stomach-turning. The goo became better known after Oliver highlighted it on his show, demonstrating how it’s made from scraps that are soaked in ammonium hydroxide and then ground into a pinkish form that looks something like hamburger meat.

McDonald’s has confirmed that it has stopped use the stuff, even as The Daily has reported that the Agriculture Department plans to buy 7 million pounds of it for public school cafeterias in the next several months.

McDonald’s recently released a statement saying that at the beginning of last year, “we made a decision to discontinue to the use of ammonia-treated beef in our hamburgers,” but it has only been widely reported within the last few days. McDonald’s denies that Oliver’s show had anything to do with halting the practice, and it does appear that they stopped using it before Oliver’s show aired in April.

The USDA actually contends that beef scraps treated with ammonia hydroxide is “generally recognized as safe,” but when you actually see what it’s like, you might think differently. Oliver tried to get the stuff, which he says is in 70% of U.S. beef, out of both fast food restaurants and public school cafeterias.

It’s unclear whether McDonald’s is able to drop the practice without it costing the fast-food chain more to make its burgers. But for those who eat at McDonald’s because they see it as the most cost-effective way to eat — a dubious reason, to say the least — it’s a good thing the company has halted the practice.


McDonald’s Drops ‘Pink Slime’ From Hamburger Meat

Related

For years, the world’s leading fast-food chain used a “pink slime” as beef filler for its burgers in the U.S. After a campaign by celebrity chef Jamie Oliver, McDonald’s has abandoned the goo.

Oliver, who stars in his own TV show “Jamie Oliver’s Food Revolution,” has been campaigning for months to get fast-food chains to stop using the pink slime, which is technically discarded beef cuts treated with ammonium hydroxide.

While it’s approved by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, it’s still rather stomach-turning. The goo became better known after Oliver highlighted it on his show, demonstrating how it’s made from scraps that are soaked in ammonium hydroxide and then ground into a pinkish form that looks something like hamburger meat.

McDonald’s has confirmed that it has stopped use the stuff, even as The Daily has reported that the Agriculture Department plans to buy 7 million pounds of it for public school cafeterias in the next several months.

McDonald’s recently released a statement saying that at the beginning of last year, “we made a decision to discontinue to the use of ammonia-treated beef in our hamburgers,” but it has only been widely reported within the last few days. McDonald’s denies that Oliver’s show had anything to do with halting the practice, and it does appear that they stopped using it before Oliver’s show aired in April.

The USDA actually contends that beef scraps treated with ammonia hydroxide is “generally recognized as safe,” but when you actually see what it’s like, you might think differently. Oliver tried to get the stuff, which he says is in 70% of U.S. beef, out of both fast food restaurants and public school cafeterias.

It’s unclear whether McDonald’s is able to drop the practice without it costing the fast-food chain more to make its burgers. But for those who eat at McDonald’s because they see it as the most cost-effective way to eat — a dubious reason, to say the least — it’s a good thing the company has halted the practice.


Watch the video: Assassination by Media: The Pink Slime Case (June 2022).


Comments:

  1. Ashburn

    I think, to you will help to find the correct decision. Be not afflicted.

  2. Chogan

    I consider, that you are mistaken. Email me at PM, we will discuss.

  3. Allister

    Not logical

  4. Age

    What a necessary sentence ... great, excellent idea

  5. Reilley

    But is there another way out?



Write a message